O Let the Son of God Enfold you

Biblical Truth

Jesus said to them, “Come and have breakfast.” None of the disciples dared ask him, “Who are you?” They knew it was the Lord. Jesus came, took the bread and gave it to them, and did the same with the fish. This was now the third time Jesus appeared to his disciples after he was raised from the dead.
When they had finished eating, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon son of John, do you truly love me more than these?”
“Yes Lord,” he said, ̶you know that I love you.
Jesus said, “Feed my lambs.”
Again Jesus said, “Simon son of John, do you truly love me?”
He answered, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you."
Jesus said, “Take care of my sheep.”
The third time he said to hem, “Simon son of John, do you love me?”
Peter was hurt because Jesus asked him the third time, “Do you love me?” He said, “Lord, you know all things; you know that I love you.”
Jesus said, “Feed my sheep. II till you the truth, when you were younger you dressed yourself and went where you wanted; but when you are old you will stretch out your hands and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go.” Jesus said this to indicate the kind of death by which Peter would glorify God. Then he said to him, “Follow me!”

John 21:12-19

Musical Offering

Ben’s Offering

I’ve heard a few different interpretations of this reading. Both deal with why Jesus asks the same question three times. One suggests that it is balancing out the three times Peter denied Jesus, while the other went on the translation of the word Love – we have one word where as the Greek/Aramaic languages had many different words for Love. But for me, I’m liking the call. When Peter says he loves Jesus, he is told to feed his lambs, take care of his sheep and feed his sheep. When we say that we love God, likewise we are also called to feed the lambs, that is to bring people to Christ (young Christians), to take care of his sheep, that is, to provide those that are already Christians with resources to further their relationship with God, and to feed his sheep – teaching those who call themselves Christians about the wonder of God’s love, because we can never be reminded about it too many times.

This is a wonderful arrangement of the hymn “Spirit Song” – I love this hymn, especially the chorus: “Jesus, O Jesus, Come and fill your Lambs” and this line in the second verse: “O give Him all your tears and sadness Give Him all your years of pain and you’ll enter into life in Jesus’ name.”

Advertisements

The Lord is my Shepherd

Biblical Truth

The LORD is my shepherd, I shall not be in want.
He makes me lie down in green pastures, he leads me beside quiet waters,
he restores my soul. He guides me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.
Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.
You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies. You anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows.
Surely goodness and love will follow me all the days of my life, and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever.

Psalm 23 (NIV)

Musical Offering

Ben’s Offering

Perhaps it’s just because I haven’t been paying as much attention as I should have been, or perhaps it’s because I got complacent thinking I knew this psalm, but I can’t remember having ever noticed the last two verses of this reading. It’s really inspiring. I especially love the line “my cup overflows.” It’s something that I’ve reflected on a bit recently, and has been a continuing theme at Floreat. “God is more than enough.” When they raised $12,000 at their fete up on last year’s $7,000 – “He is more than enough.” The more I discover about my wonderful girlfriend, the more that makes me love her – “He is more than enough” When I worry that I might not be able to put together a sermon for the upcoming youth service – “He is more than enough.” Trust in the Lord, and what will happen? “… goodness and love will follow me all the days of my life, and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever.

What a wonderful setting of the 23rd Psalm. The 6th movement in John Rutter’s Requiem, a musical setting of the Roman Catholic Requiem Mass, it was completed and first performed in 1985, but this movement was originally written in 1976 as a separate anthem. It’s got a wonderfully calm setting – the oboe playing its wonderful pastoral role, and some wonderful harmonic painting.